the PCB Magazine

PCB-Aug2017

Issue link: http://iconnect007.uberflip.com/i/857644

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 88 of 105

August 2017 • The PCB Magazine 89 References 1. Mordechay Schlesinger, Milan Paunovic. Modern Electroplating, Fifth edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2010. 2. Clyde F. Coombs Jr., Printed Circuit Hand- book, Sixth edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2008. 3. K. B. Herbert; S. Adhikari; J. E. Houser, Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 152 (5) C324-C329, 2005. 4. M. Hakamada; Y. Nakamoto; H. Matsu- moto; H. Iwasaki; Y. Chen; H. Kusuda; M. Ma- buchi., Materials Transactions, 48, (9) 2336 to 2339, 2007. Saminda Dharmarathna is senior research chemist with MacDermid Enthone Electronics Solutions in Waterbury, Connecticut. Ivan Li is senior application manager, MacDermid Enthone Global Development Application Center in Taiwan. Maddux Sy is application manager, MacDermid Enthone Global Development Application Center in Taiwan. Eileen Zeng is assistant application manager, MacDermid Enthone Global Development Application Center in Suzhou. Bob Wei is assistant application manager, MacDermid Enthone Global Development Application Center in Shanghai. William Bowerman is director of metallization, MacDermid Enthone Electronics Solutions in Waterbury, Connecticut. Kesheng Feng is research director of metallization, MacDermid Enthone Electronics Solutions in Waterbury, CT. Wearable technologies—from heart rate mon- itors to virtual reality headsets—are exploding in popularity in both the consumer and research spaces, but most of the electronic sensors that de- tect and transmit data from wearables are made of hard, inflexible materials that can restrict both the wearer's natural movements and the accura- cy of the data collected. Now, a team at Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Bio- logically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has cre- ated a highly-sensitive soft capacitive sensor made of silicone and fabric that moves and flex- es with the human body to accurately detect movement. "We're really ex- cited about this sen- sor because, by lever- aging textiles in its construction, it is inherently suitable for integration with fabric to make smart robotic apparel," said corresponding author Conor Walsh, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at SEAS and Core Faculty member at the Wyss Institute. "Additionally, we have designed a unique batch-manufacturing process that creates cus- tom-shaped sensors that share uniform properties, making it possible to quickly fabricate them for a given application," said co-author Ozgur Atalay, a postdoctoral fellow at the Wyss Insti- tute. This research is published in the current is- sue of Advanced Materials Tech- nologies, and the protocol is avail- able as part of the Harvard Bio- design Lab's Soft Robotics Toolkit. Soft and Stretchy Fabric-Based Sensors for Wearable Robots HIGH-THROW DC ACID COPPER FORMULATION FOR VERTICAL CONTINUOUS ELECTROPLATING PROCESSES

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of the PCB Magazine - PCB-Aug2017