the PCB Magazine

PCB-July2017

Issue link: http://iconnect007.uberflip.com/i/845602

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 50 of 115

July 2017 • The PCB Magazine 51 stay out of the way. He asked us to email him if we were facing a reduction in force due to a gov- ernment regulation change. That impressed me. Goldman: You've gone to more of these IM- PACT events than I have, but it seems that we're seeing perhaps a higher level of people within the administrations. Raby: We are and, continuing with the theme, they really did seem genuinely interested in what we had to say. EPA Administrator Pruitt knew some of what we were talking about but would look to his deputy for help on other issues and ask IPC to send him more information on others. IPC has done a lot of work on environmental issues but this was our first time to get to meet with the Administrator and he seemed genuinely happy to see us and get our input. We were not treated like we were the enemy. Mr. Meeks was also very welcoming. He was receptive to IPC's position and stressed his man- date to help us create jobs (everyone we talk- ed with seemed to understand that government does not create jobs) and had a particular inter- est in high-tech and space which are both near and dear to my heart. Goldman: I was impressed by Kim Ford, the deputy assistant secretary for Education, and her enthusiasm and interest in what we do and how her department can help. Raby: Yes, she was great. It was funny. John [Mitchell] was trying to get the meeting start- ed and she was going around the room shaking hands with everybody and introducing herself. She was just bubbling and seemed so excited to be with us. She was in that job during the last administration, but she didn't come speak to us and we didn't see her. I may be wrong on this but my impression was she seemed to have been freed to do her job and was very excited at the prospect. She understood what was going on in our industry regarding skills gaps and was quick to say (even being from the U.S. Department of Education) that not everyone needs to go to col - lege. She also recognized that some of that skills gap is a basic education of what is expected from an employee. Goldman: And as she said, part of it is Johnny coming to work every day. Raby: Yes. Well, that's the thing you know. "Do I really have to be there at 8:00 every morn- ing?" "Yeah you do." I was impressed with ev- erybody we met today. What really stands out in my mind though is their enthusiasm, will- ingness to listen and genuine interest in finding solutions for our industry. Goldman: I wonder, the administration has been in office about a hundred days, as they keep telling us. Did these people and depart- ments really change that quickly? Or was it like this before and it was just suppressed? Raby: I don't know the answer to that. It would be guessing on my part, because we didn't meet with these people before. Everyone we met with today seemed to be committed to working with industry to solve the problems we have, and the status quo in many cases is the problem. Goldman: And I'm sure we wouldn't have got- ten to talk with the head of the EPA last year. I don't know, but my guess is no. IMPACT Interviews

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of the PCB Magazine - PCB-July2017